The image isn’t “stoner” anymore. The face of the “pothead” has transformed from tie-dye to suit and tie, and so has the new leader of NORML.

Wyoming’s new director of its chapter of NORML, National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, is a Republican, in his 60s. Meet Frank Latta. He says he doesn’t use marijuana but noted that a doctor from out-of-state did recommend he try it. Frank has Multiple Sclerosis.

Frank Latta started his job Jan. 1, before the 64th Wyoming Legislature convened. He was mayor of Gillette and served in the Wyoming House from 2003 to 2005. For many Wyomingites it’s difficult to find out where lawmakers stand, but Frank knows who to talk to, and has daily meetings with legislation members. Where Cowboy state citizens stand, however, is overwhelmingly for reform.

The latest initiative, HB-157, that didn't make a November deadline, did look promising for those who want reform, but where the next bill ends up is anything but clear. The last state-wide poll is clear. Support for medical marijuana increased from 2014, at 74 percent, to 81 percent in 2016.

The only age group where a majority thought that small possession should get jail was those 75 and older. Any idea most pot enthusiasts are still just college age is now just old, even to the older. Much like Facebook was originally used only by students, now it's the favorite social network of grandparents. One business looking page on Facebook is Weed Wyoming.

Rep. Mark Baker, a Republican from Rock Springs, sponsoring HB-157  It would have had civil fines instead of criminal charges for those with small amounts. Fines vary by possession. Cannabis in liquid form up to three-tenths of a gram would be decriminalized. For plant form, it would be up to 3 ounces. For edibles, it would be 3 ounces or 500 milligrams.

Though legislators move very deliberate on Wyoming weed, do you get a sense the state will have to act on a marijuana makeover - if not sooner - maybe not too much later?