Yellowstone National Park raised its fees for fishing and boating permits effective immediately to better fight invasive species, according to a prepared statement from the park.

The last increase for fishing permits went into effect in 2012, and the last increase for boating permits went into effect in 1993.

The park never has charged for inspections for aquatic invasive species (AIS) on boats, but it does now.

In 2020, the park determined it lacked the money -- nearly $3 million a year -- to continue to prevent and reduce the invasive species that affect fisheries in the park, especially in the Yellowstone Lake ecosystem.

Scientists estimate the park needs another five years at that investment level to achieve the its goals of native Yellowstone cutthroat trout restoration and AIS prevention, early detection and eradication.

Good trout -- native cutthroat. Jay Fleming, National Park Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bad trout - Invasive-lake trout. Jay Fleming, National Park Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fee increases will provide that sustained revenue source for those efforts.

"Efforts to restore native fish in Yellowstone Lake remain one of our highest conservation priorities," Superintendent Cam Sholly said.

"Our continued success will be largely dependent on a permanent and reliable revenue stream that will not only help us continue our native fish restoration efforts, but also increase our capacity to detect and prevent new nonnative species from entering Yellowstone's waters," Sholly said.

He also credited supporters and partners such as Trout Unlimited and Yellowstone Forever that have worked to rid and prevent invasive species.

 

Fishing permits:

Anglers will be able to purchase fishing permits online via Recreation.gov for the upcoming season. They also can buy permits at stores in the park and surrounding communities beginning this spring.

The new online system will enable anglers to plan ahead and have their fishing permits before arriving at the park.

The new fees were determined by taking the average of resident and non-resident fishing permit fees from Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho.

The new fishing permit fees are:

  • Three-day permit -- $40, up from $18.
  • Seven-day permit -- $55, up from $25.
  • Seasonal permit -- $75, up from $40.

 

Boating permits:

Boaters can obtain a permit and aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspection only in-person at various locations in the park. Permits are not available online.

The new fees are comparable to those of state and other national park permits.

In addition, the new permit fees will include an AIS fee for inspections.

The new boating fees are:

  • Seven-day non-motorized -- $20, up from $5; includes $10 AIS fee.
  • Seasonal non-motorized -- $30, up from $10; includes $10 AIS fee.
  • Seven-day motorized -- $40, up from $10; includes $20 AIS fee.
  • Seasonal motorized -- $60, up from $20; includes $20 AIS fee.
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