Fears that legalizing marijuana would raise teen usage may be unfounded. “According to Colorado’s biannual Healthy Kids Colorado Survey, the rate of marijuana consumption amongst Colorado’s teenagers has declined marginally since 2011 – further dispelling the prohibitionists’ argument that legalization leads to increased use amongst teenagers.” says marijuana.com.

Scientific American says “The survey shows marijuana use has not increased since legalization, with four of five high school students continuing to say they don't use marijuana, even occasionally.”

However, Diane Carlson, of SMART Colorado, promoting tighter regulations to keep cannabis away from children, said Colorado ranks first in the nation for marijuana by those of ages between 12 and 17.

Carlson said it was “deeply concerning” that just 48 percent of students viewed regular marijuana use as a risky behavior.

While 21.2 percent of some 17,000 Colorado students surveyed had used marijuana in 2015, nationwide, teenage marijuana use by teens is slightly higher at 21.7 percent.

Usnews says “The 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey and two other federally funded surveys have found that U.S. teen marijuana use is static amid a surge in support for legalization and increasingly liberal state laws allowing for medical marijuana or adult use of recreational marijuana.” They also wrote that SMART pointed to ‘a press release to increases in reported pot use among high school juniors and seniors, under the subject line "New Data Shows Colorado Youth Marijuana Use on the Rise Since Legalization."

A department statement said "The survey shows marijuana use has not increased since legalization, with four of five high school students continuing to say they don't use marijuana, even occasionally." Fox